4 Unusual and Easy Car Games that Focus on Communication Skills

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Communication skills are essential! Here are five unusual car games that focus on communication.

4 Unusual and Easy Car Games that Focus on Communication Skills

Communication skills are essential in life. You’ve got to be able to talk clearly, confidently, and concisely. While teaching these skills to your kids might seem boring, it doesn’t have to be. Here are five car games that’ll help.

They’re a bit unusual, but definitely fun!

1. Asking & Answering Questions

This game is super simple, but it focuses on an important communication skill: being able to ask and answer questions. Feel free to change up the questions based on your children’s age and ability.

How to Play:

First, one person asks a question. It can be about anything. Then, everyone else takes a turn answering.

Another player poses a question, starting the next round of the game.

Some of the Questions We’ve Used:

  1. Who is your favorite character in (name a TV show)?
  2. If you could be an animal, what kind would you be?
  3. What time do you think we’ll arrive at Grandma’s house?
  4. Did you see that cow? What would be a good name for it?
  5. If you could have a super power, which one would you pick?
  6. What’s your favorite book?
  7. If you could go into a TV show for one day, which show would you go into?
  8. Why do you think giraffes have long necks?
  9. What would you do if it started raining gumdrops?
  10. What supplies do you think you’ll need for school next year?

2. Radio Ads

This game is a creativity building, confidence boosting activity. It works best for upper elementary aged and older kids.

Radio ads are all based on auditory components. They don’t have the benefit of special visual effects to get someone to buy a product. All players will be creating a radio ad for a product they invent.

How to Play:

Give everyone 5-10 minutes to think of an invention they think the world needs.

When the think time is up, each person takes a turn offering an oral presentation about their invention. You’ll want to share:

  • What you’d call your invention
  • What your invention does
  • Why someone would want your invention

The goal is to make other people want your invention. Speak with confidence! Think of it like an elevator pitch for your invention.

3. What Movie Has …?

Being able to think quickly plays a huge role in communication skills. This game practices that skill in a kid friendly way. My kids and I enjoyed it for almost an hour on our last road trip!

How to Play:

One person is the host first. This person’s job is to ask the questions. Everyone else answers.

The host thinks of an object, and then asks, “What movie has a ____” filling in the blank with the name of the object.

Everyone else thinks quickly, and sees who can provide the name of a movie first.

Here’s some examples:

What movie has a spaceship? (Possible response: Star Trek)

What movie has a dog? (Possible response: Space Buddies)

As you can see, the answers can vary widely. Players might even come up with two or more movies for the same object.

If any player questions the answer, the person who gave the answer must describe the scene that had the object. This helps players practice defending their answer with factual information.

Keep going until you run out of ideas, or players lose interest.

4. The Tone Game

This is a fun car game for younger kids. The goal is to think about how your tone of voice impacts your message.

How to Play:

As the host, you’ll be in charge of giving directions. Ask your kids to say things in a certain way to share a message. It sounds complicated, but it’s not.

Here’s a look at a couple of directions you could give:

  • Pretend that you’re mad. Now say, “I don’t want to go.”
  • If you were scared, how would you sound if you said, “What was that?”
  • In a surprised voice, ask “When did you get here?”

After each response you can talk about the emotions displayed in the voice.

Then, you can switch it up a bit. This time, you’ll do the talking and it’s the kids’ turn to decide what emotion you’re feeling. So say something in a happy voice, and then ask the kids how they think you are feeling.

Next, use your serious voice and say something else. Continue the conversation about how your tone can show what you’re feeling.

Can you think of other car games that practice communication skills?

I’d love for you to share in the comments!

Want other fun car games to try?

ELA Car Games

Observation Building Car Games

Musical Car Games

Social Studies Car Games

Science Car Games

 

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